February 25, 2024

Telma Kinney

Advanced Gadgets

A Parable While Strolling Through The Land Of Cloud Computing

Introduction

In the days of old when software was still written on punch cards and distributed to users in a box, there was only one way to run a piece of software. If you wanted to use it, you had no choice but to buy that particular hardware/software combination. But once PCs became widely available and more affordable, it gave users the flexibility to run their applications on any hardware they chose provided that OS supported it. Fast forward another decade or so and now we have the web which brought about a massive change in how we access applications by making them accessible from anywhere at any time with any device plugged into an internet connection; this meant people could use those same devices even at home or while commuting on public transport! However, as well as bringing lots of benefits this also caused concern among IT departments worried about security breaches which could potentially lead to data leakage or even theft by hackers.”

In the days of old when software was still written on punch cards and distributed to users in a box, there was only one way to run a piece of software.

In the days of old when software was still written on punch cards and distributed to users in a box, there was only one way to run a piece of software. You had to install it on your own computer and then run it from there.

This was a problem because most people didn’t have their own computers at home yet–they were still using mainframes at work or school–so if you wanted to share your new game with friends or family members who weren’t near you physically, then they would have had no choice but try playing it themselves (and probably get frustrated).

Then came the PC, and with it user flexibility. You could run your application on any hardware you wanted, provided it was supported by your operating system (OS).

The PC was a revolution. You could run your application on any hardware you wanted, provided it was supported by your operating system (OS).

Then came the cloud, and with it user flexibility once again. You could run your application on any cloud infrastructure provider (or IaaS) that you wanted, provided they had an API connection to your OS-based software.

With the advent of the web, browsers such as Netscape Navigator and Internet Explorer were the dominant way that most people accessed their applications from anywhere. And those applications were mostly standalone.

With the advent of the web, browsers such as Netscape Navigator and Internet Explorer were the dominant way that most people accessed their applications from anywhere. And those applications were mostly standalone.

Browsers are not standalone applications. They’re merely a way to access other applications–the same way a remote control is used to access television content or an app on your phone allows you to get directions without having Google Maps installed on your computer. The difference here is that browsers allow you access at any time or place (and often much more quickly than if you had to download and install something).

Fast forward to today where cloud computing is rapidly becoming one of the hottest topics in IT for two reasons; firstly because of the massive cost savings it offers and secondly because it allows seamless sharing of resources between applications not just within an organisation but even across organisations via APIs (application programming interfaces).

Fast forward to today where cloud computing is rapidly becoming one of the hottest topics in IT for two reasons; firstly because of the massive cost savings it offers and secondly because it allows seamless sharing of resources between applications not just within an organisation but even across organisations via APIs (application programming interfaces).

Cloud computing has evolved from a new way of delivering IT services to a mainstream technology that can be used by organisations of all sizes, across all industries. It has now become an essential part of any modern digital business strategy as well as being instrumental in helping companies overcome their IT challenges such as security, scalability and compliance requirements without having to invest heavily into on-premise infrastructure or hiring costly resources like system administrators.

The takeaway here is that interoperability and portability are essential elements for creating infrastructure as code for DevOps

You could also think of this parable as a lesson in the importance of interoperability and portability. If we want to create infrastructure as code for DevOps, it’s crucial that we use tools that are able to work together seamlessly. This means using open standards like Docker and Kubernetes so you can easily move between cloud providers or bring your cloud-based app onto any machine without having to re-write it from scratch.

Conclusion

This is just one of many stories in our land of cloud computing. There are many more stories to tell, and we’re looking forward to telling them with you!